Assessment Strategies
NCATE 1, 4; INTASC 8

 

 Professional Employment 
    Portfolio


Resume

Philosophy

Field Experiences

Lessons, Units, Tech Projects

Modifying
Lessons

Assessment

Teacher Work Sample

See Me at Work Photos, Videos

References 

Final Reflection

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

      

 

 


Being articulate about current issues in assessment is important--what are your beliefs? Assessment questions you should address in your classes and in your field experiences include:

How do I foster student creativity and achievement?  
How will I grade students? What will count? How much? 
How will I ensure I am fair? 
How many chances so I want to give students to complete their work?
What if students don't do their homework? 
How will I modify assignments so students can be successful? 
How will I communicate how students are doing in classes with families? 

In classes, as you develop lessons and units, you will be asked to think of different strategies to find out what your students have learned from the material or the experience. In the beginning, random questions of the group, quizzes, games, word searches, jot notes, mini demos, and learning logs are useful for informally assessing lessons. 

Summaries may be strategies you call on to check out student learning from a lesson. For example, the 3, 2,1 Strategy, in which a teacher asks students to list 3 main ideas they learned, 2 insights or applications, and 1 question that they have is one some teachers employ. You can vary this strategy for your own purposes: in social studies, 3 events, 2 important people, and 1 action if done differently would alter the course of history; in literature, identify 3 memorable characters, describe 2 themes, and 1 scene you liked.

As a professional teacher, you will want to have the knowledge and skills to develop an array of assessment vehicles that you can use in your future teaching, including selected response tests, essay questions, performance-based tasks, portfolios,  exhibitions, affective measures. Rubrics, checklists and rating scales are tools you will use to assess the quality of student products and performances.

Assessment Samples: Created by SHU preservice teacher education students

     Selected Response
     Interpretive Exercises
     Simplified Test Directions
     Essay Questions
     Performance-Based Tasks
     Portfolio Plans
     Exhibitions
    
Affective Measures

Learning /
 Assessment 
Portfolio

Standards

Courses

What's an 
Artifact?

Developing a 
Philosophy 
Statement

Service Learning

Field Experience

Lesson Plans

Curriculum Units

Tech Projects

Gallery/Exhibition 

Assessment 
Strategies

Action Research 
Projects

Working 
with Families
 

Recommendations

Reflection

   
     

Homepage

Roberta Devlin-Scherer, Seton Hall University
January 2, 2001
Updated  05/17/06
devlinrb@shu.edu