Seton Hall University
College of Education and Human Services
Portfolio Handbook for Students

 

  Professional   Employment
 Portfolio

Resume

Philosophy

Field Experiences

Lessons, Units, Tech Projects

Modifying
Lessons

Assessment Samples

Teacher Work Sample

See Me at Work Photos,Videos

References 

Final Reflection

Praxis

 

 

      

 

 

 

This electronic portfolio is designed to guide others as  they create their own electronic or print portfolios. On the right side are headings that describe topics, artifacts or exhibits that are usually part of a program portfolio. Learning / Assessment portfolios are developed as prospective or experienced teachers participate in field experiences or courses in a teacher education program. On the left hand side, the professional employment portfolio, is a selected collection of a candidate's best work to be shared when applying for positions. Suggestions for ways to present materials and examples are offered in each section under each heading. A copy of the portfolio development process can be used as a guide. 

  Exhibits of a teacher's work can be shared during an interview or a disk may be left for the interviewing team. The advantage of an electronic portfolio is its accessibility and portability. A disadvantage can be the tech limitations of the reviewing committee. In this case, a candidate could convert files to videotape.

In classes, with faculty, with other students and in field experiences, students may want to use the outline below and in Developing a Philosophy Statement to begin discussing the contents and appearance of their portfolio. 

Designing the Portfolio

  1. a. Here are some examples of what I should collect:
        photographs
        scanned images
        philosophy statement
        evidence of standards

    b. What  I will collect . . .

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

  2. Possible themes for my portfolio…

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

  3. Ways to make my portfolio unique...

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

    _________________________ 

  4. Possible formats for my teacher portfolio…

    _________________________      

    _________________________           

    _________________________      

    _________________________ 

  5. Ways I can incorporate my philosophy, beliefs 
    and reflections
    in my portfolio . . .

           _________________________      

           _________________________              

           _________________________      

           _________________________ 

Sources to further guide portfolio development include:

Dr. Helen Barrett's eportfolio site
http://electronicportfolios.com

Seton Hall University PT3 Grant Learning Station on Portfolios
http://education.shu.edu/pt3grant/devlin-scherer/rds_learningstation2.html

Sample e-portfolio models:

A former SHU undergraduate
http://pirate.shu.edu/~perezali/

An experienced middle school teacher http://education.shu.edu/portfolios/AGarcia/myelectronicportfolio.html

A career changer excited about teaching in college and high school
http://pirate.shu.edu/~martinjj/MartinelliPortfolioSP2002.htm

Learning /
 Assessment 
Portfolio

Praxis

Standards

Courses

What's an 
Artifact?

Developing a 
Philosophy 
Statement

Service Learning

Field Experience

Lesson Plans

Curriculum Units

Tech Projects

Gallery/Exhibition 

Assessment 
Strategies

Action Research 
Projects

Working 
with Families
 

Recommendations

Reflection

   
     

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Roberta Devlin-Scherer, Seton Hall University
February 6, 2003
Updated  09/22/05
devlinrb@shu.edu